• Mental Health in South Africa

    Mending the Minds of the Mentally Ill

    Photo: Joshua Earle

  • World of Birds

    Rehabilitating Cape Town’s Wildlife

    Photo: Erica Harrison

  • Bonnytoun

    Teaching Life Skills to At-Risk Youths

    Photo: Erica Harrison

  • Zerilda Park Primary

    A Place of Happiness

    Photo: Jana Uellendahl

  • Projects Abroad Nutrition Project

    Teaching healthy & affordable eating habits

    Photo: Cara Sainsburyl

  • My First Skydive

    Overcoming my fear of heights

    Photo: Jana Uellendahl

Online Articles

Mental Health in South Africa

Mending the Minds of the Mentally Ill

Words Liv Raimonde

Mental heath has been a mystery that has eluded the world for ages. While society continues to make exponential strides in diagnosing and treating physical illness somehow mental illness has fallen behind in every aspect from education and awareness to funding and treatment. So this poses an important question. Why doesn’t society have a better understanding of mental illness?

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World of Birds

Rehabilitating Cape Town’s Wildlife

Words Erica Harrison

More than four decades ago Walter Mangold was an average Capetonian who had a knack for taking care of sick or injured birds that he came across in his local area. Word quickly spread and he was soon dubbed the 'Bird Man', with people constantly handing in injured birds to him to care for. His undeniable passion to help wildlife evolved, and in the mid 1970s he opened World of Birds in Hout Bay, a sanctuary where he housed and cared for his hundreds of injured birds and small mammals, giving them hope for a healthier and safe life. Today, World of Birds is the largest bird park in Africa and is home to more than 3,000 animals that range from squawking macaws to cheeky monkeys.

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Zerilda Park Primary

A Place of Happiness

Words Jana Uellendahl

It was barely nine o’clock in the morning when the parent burst into the office. ‘There’s nothing wrong with my child, it’s your school that’s the problem!’ The parent is shaking with anger as he approaches the principal’s desk. After 40 years of teaching, the principal is used to people blaming her, yet she still has vast amounts of empathy.

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Projects Abroad Nutrition Project

Teaching Healthy & Affordable Eating Habits

Words Cara Sainsbury

According to UNICEF, many of the global under-five deaths occur in children already weakened by malnutrition. In 2010 this amounted to 4.2% of children under-five in the Western Cape being diagnosed as suffering severe malnutrition. On the opposite end of the scale, we have the South African Medical Research Council reporting that nearly 70% of South African women are both overweight and obese. This means it’s not uncommon to have an overweight parent, with an under-nourished child in the same family.

Read More »

Blogs

Education for the Future

Developing New Teaching Methods for Generation Z

Words Abbiramy Anpalagan

Education is the key to reducing poverty and inequality as well as promoting growth of the economy. It is one of the most crucial aspects for the development of a country, and for many the way to a better life. But does the classroom really prepare youngsters for the future? Especially if we consider that the teaching method in today’s schools was designed for a totally different kind of student.

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Bonnytoun

Teaching Life Skills to At-Risk Youth

Words Erica Harrison

There are eight of us in the car; myself, five Projects Abroad volunteers from the human rights office, our coordinator and our driver. As we drive through the gates of Bonnytoun we are met with high walls, barbed wire fences and uniformed officers, and I begin to feel slightly nervous at my decision to visit this boys’ juvenile detention centre.

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Projects Abroad Holiday Programme

Four Weeks of Smiling Faces

Words Jana Uellendahl

It is the best season of the year – a season called holiday. Everybody is excited to spend time with the special people in their life. Whether you choose to hang out at the beach or amble around the shops – when it’s vacation your time is your own. For some children, school holidays can be filled with blank days, with nowhere to go, especially if both parents are working. That’s where the Projects Abroad holiday programme comes in!

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Quiet Nobility

Living a Life That Inspires Others

Words William Dodd

I think as you reach the end of something, you begin to look back. Throughout my whole time in South Africa, I’ve kept my gaze forward – focusing on the future, what work there is to be done. Throughout these final weeks, however, I’ve turned my gaze and begun to look back.

Read More »

 

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Video Reporting

Mental Health in South Africa

Mental heath has been a mystery that has eluded the world for ages. While society continues to make exponential strides in diagnosing and treating physical illness somehow mental illness has fallen behind in every aspect from education and awareness to funding and treatment. So this poses an important question. Why doesn't society have a better understanding of mental illness?

World of Birds

More than four decades ago Walter Mangold was an average Capetonian who had a knack for taking care of sick or injured birds that he came across in his local area. Word quickly spread and he was soon dubbed the 'Bird Man', with people constantly handing in injured birds to him to care for. His undeniable passion to help wildlife evolved, and in the mid 1970s he opened World of Birds in Hout Bay, a sanctuary where he housed and cared for his hundreds of injured birds and small mammals, giving them hope for a healthier and safe life. Today, World of Birds is the largest bird park in Africa and is home to more than 3,000 animals that range from squawking macaws to cheeky monkeys.

Bonnytoun

There are eight of us in the car; myself, five Projects Abroad volunteers from the human rights office, our coordinator and our driver. As we drive through the gates of Bonnytoun we are met with high walls, barbed wire fences and uniformed officers, and I begin to feel slightly nervous at my decision to visit this boys' juvenile detention centre.

Zerilda Park Primary

It was barely nine o'clock in the morning when the parent burst into the office. 'There's nothing wrong with my child, i's your school that's the problem!' The parent is shaking with anger as he approaches the principal's desk. After 40 years of teaching, the principal is used to people blaming her, yet she still has vast amounts of empathy.

Projects Abroad Nutrition Project

According to UNICEF, many of the global under-five deaths occur in children already weakened by malnutrition. In 2010 this amounted to 4.2% of children under-five in the Western Cape being diagnosed as suffering severe malnutrition. On the opposite end of the scale, we have the South African Medical Research Council reporting that nearly 70% of South African women are both overweight and obese. This means its not uncommon to have an overweight parent, with an under-nourished child in the same family.

A Special Evening of Love

It is Saturday afternoon, 5pm in Vrygrond. The sun is still shining and everybody can feel that it's not a usual Saturday evening: Love is in the air! Situated near the coastal suburb of Muizenberg, the staff of the Training & Development Foundation Where Rainbows Meet (WRM) has one particular aim for the upcoming night: Let's make an unforgettable Valentine's event for the community in Vrygrond.

Aquila Private Game Reserve Safari

I had never been on a safari before, and after a month in Cape Town, planning and organising various tours and excursions, I finally found the time to experience a safari adventure! Located in the historic town of Touws Rivier, in a valley between the Langeberg and the Outeniqua Mountains in the Karoo, my roommate, Melodie and I hopped into a taxi that took us to the Aquila Private Game Reserve.

Housing the poor

We all dream of owning our dream home. We plan, save and look forward to the day we can call a house our own. However, for most people who live in the Mitchell's Plain area in Cape Town, four walls and a roof can remain a distant dream.

High School Dropouts

President Jacob Zuma recently said that education is the government's number one priority, and it should be, because along with the celebration of the good matric results of 2013 came the shocking revelation that out of the 1,261,827 pupils who started Grade 1 in 2002, 699,715 of them dropped out of school before their final exams in Grade 12 last year.

Tik Abuse

Tik, the local name for crystal methamphetamine, is an addictive central nervous system stimulant ruining the lives of thousands on the Cape Flats of the Western Cape. In fact, Ashley Potts from the Cape Town Drug Counselling Centre (CTDCC) says that on average in 2013, 20% of school-going youth were actively using crystal meth.

Building & Community Project

When visitors arrive in Cape Town, one of the first things they are told is to be careful of going into the townships. Unfortunately, South Africa is one of the most unequal countries in the world, with more than 36% of the population unemployed. The poorest 10% of the population are only able to contribute 1.2% to national revenue whereas the richest 10% contribute 51.7% of this revenue, according to statistiques-mondiales.com. Add to this the fact that the urban population is relatively high (62% in 2012; which is more than the international average of 52%, according to the same source), it is no surprise to see hundreds of makeshift houses on the drive from the airport to town. These shacks, composed of sheet metal and other materials, form what look like small cities, and such a densely packed population often brings about violence and crime.

Hip-Hop Dance

‘Release your energy in a positive way.’ That’s the role of hip-hop dance according to award winner Emile Jansen, pioneer of hip-hop dance in South Africa and founding member of Black Noise and creator of Heal the Hood organisation. For Emile, dancing is all about letting off steam, but in a creative way. Growing up during the apartheid era made dancing extremely important because it was a free-style activity you could do without being characterised by the colour of their skin. ‘It’s all about your skill. It’s not about how rich you are or the colour of your skin, it’s about the skill you bring to the floor,’ Emile says.